Lucia Del Guerzo hosts the Gonson Lectures
Gonson Daytime Lecture Series

Wednesdays, 11am  |  Spiegel Auditorium, 56 Brattle Street  |  $5

Enliven your Wednesday mornings with stimulating presentations at the Cambridge Center!  Presenters will focus on a wide range of topics, from art history to civic engagement.

Eventbrite - Gonson Daytime Lecture Series

October 4, 2017 | Tickets
CLEAN EATING ON A BUDGET
Jennifer Hanway | Certified Holistic Nutritionist, Certified Personal Trainer
This workshop will teach you how to eat clean, healthy, delicious foods without breaking the bank. Together, you will look at how to buy organic, locally raised, meat and fresh produce, the nutritious pantry staples you can buy in bulk and the ‘superfoods’ that don’t cost a super-fortune. Jennifer will hand out shopping lists for all the major grocery stores in the area, along with meal and snack suggestions, and money saving tips and tricks. Join her, as she discusses meal prepping ideas and recipes as well as the healthier and budget friendly options for eating out in your location.

October 11, 2017 | Tickets
PRESERVING HISTORY: PUBLIC MEDIA ARCHIVES AT WGBH
Karen Cariani | Senior Director, WGBH Media Library and Archives
Casey Davis Kaufman | Associate Director, WGBH Media Library and Archives
Public broadcasting has been on the front lines of history for nearly seven decades. At WGBH, archivists are actively digitizing, preserving, and providing access to this corpus of our recorded cultural heritage. Join two WGBH archivists in a discussion on the innovative preservation of nearly 1 million audio, video, film, and digital assets dating back to 1947. Find out how you can help in the effort to improve the searchability and accessibility of digitized, historic public media content with a game called FIX IT. History and public media enthusiasts, lifelong learners, and fellow librarians and archivists can work to identify errors and suggest changes to transcripts of archived content, and players’ corrections will be made available in public media’s largest digital archive.

October 18, 2017 | Tickets
ENDING RACEISM: THE CIVIC ROLE OF SCIENCE AND SCIENTISTS
Carlos Hoyt | Assistant Professor of Social Work, Wheelock College
The power and persuasiveness of science in the discourse on race has swung from infamous initial validation of racial differences to present day efforts to correct scientists’ racialized conceptualizations of human beings. While scientists are increasingly vocal about the actual harm that results from employing race as a proxy for meaningfully distinct human subgroups, it is usually only within the bounds of their professional realms, not in the society in general. This lecture will discuss how science should be thoroughgoing in its recognition of the illegitimacy of race by taking a leading role in shifting society away from the racial worldview.

October 25, 2017 | Tickets
WHAT MAKES A MOVIE “GREAT”?: THE EXAMPLE OF HITCHCOCK’S VERTIGO
Mike Frank | Ph.D., Cornell University, Professor of Cinema Studies
Every ten years the British journal Sight and Sound conducts a survey, asking an international cross-section of filmmakers, scholars, and critics to choose “the greatest films ever made.” For half a century Orson Welles’ Citizen Kane finished in first place. But in the most recent poll Alfred Hitchcock’s Vertigo, a movie not widely admired when first released in 1958, took over the top spot. This lecture will consider what exactly it means to call a movie “great,” and why Vertigo might reasonably qualify as a great film.

November 1, 2017| Tickets
GREAT EMANCIPATOR OR WHITE SUPREMACIST, OR BOTH?: ABRAHAM LINCOLN AS SEEN THROUGH HIS SPEECHES AND WRITINGS
Thomas A. Horrocks | Ph.D., History, former director of John Hay Library at Brown University
Abraham Lincoln is considered by many to be this nation’s greatest president. This judgment is based primarily on his Emancipation Proclamation freeing millions of enslaved blacks and his critical role in the passage of the Thirteenth Amendment abolishing slavery in the United States. On the issues of slavery and race, however, Lincoln has had his share of critics who have argued that his reputation as The Great Emancipator and as a proponent of black freedom is built upon falsehoods and cover-ups. Critics have claimed that Lincoln was at heart a white supremacist who would have preferred to rid the country of blacks through colonization, and a reluctant emancipator who was forced to free the enslaved by events beyond his control. Dr. Horrocks will review selections from Lincoln’s speeches and writings on slavery and race in an attempt to answer the question posed in the provocative title of his lecture.